The Brexit mermaid. Windows of Rye. 2019

The Brexit mermaid. 2019. J.Harms.

The Brexit mermaid. Windows of Rye. 2019. J.Harms. Acrylic on paper. 62×48 cm.

The Windows of Rye paintings are a reflection on Brexit. The term « reflection » is to be taken both literally and figuratively. Brexit was to happen in March of this year, but has been moved back to the end of this month. Will it happen or not ? I think nobody has a clue.

In Greek mythology, any creature that is part female, part something else, is not a good omen. Such creatures will most of the time lead you to your death. If you look at them straight in the eye you will turn to stone, if you give the wrong answer to their question, they will devour you, if you listen to their song you may end up mad and drown  yourself. I wonder what this one will end up doing to Europe and the UK.

Le Grand Salon 2019.

 

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Hi !

I will be showing my most recent  paintings at the Grand Salon d’Art Abordable ( the French version of the affordable Art Fair) in Paris again this month.

It’s the only exhibition I will be doing this year.

If some of you are in the area at the end of this month, and wish to come, please direct message me and I will email you an invitation.

Check out  Here  for further information.

 

 

 

The Gate . 2019

The gate. 2019. J.Harms.

The Gate . 2019. J.Harms. Acrylic on canvas. 22x27cm.

Taking a small break from my « Windows of Rye Serie ».

There are two parts to Rye, the one built within the fortifications, the more historical side, with its church, castle and cemetery, and the one built outside of the fortifications, the more contemporary side, with its supermarket and train station.

The ultimate purpose of a door, I believe, is to warn of a coming change. Those that decide to walk through the door, are somehow informed that their perspective is going to change.

If one crosses a door and then turns around, their grasp of a place, might totally differ from what they previously thought they knew. They might find themselves in an other reality.

 

 

 

 

The yellow window. Windows of Rye. 2019

The yellow window. Windows of Rye. J.Harms.

The yellow window. 2019. J.Harms. Acrylic on Canvas 46x55cm

Another « window of Rye » and behind it, a glorious  shade of yellow, it simply caught my eye, as well as the tree that looks as if it’s embracing or protecting this fragile source of light.

This house looks joyful and warm, even though it sits right outside of the cemetery.

 

Two point of views and a back way. Windows of Rye. 2019

Two point of views and a backway.julie Harms.

Two point of views. Windows of Rye. 2019. J.Harms. Acrylic on canvas. 38×46 cm.

This is the second painting from the Windows of Rye serie. Earlier this year, a couple of weeks before the first Brexit-date was suppose to take place, I visited the medieval city of Rye in the South of England, not far from Hastings. At first, I was interested in painting the different layers of the city. I spent quite a lot of time taking pictures of the streets from all sorts of angles. It was on the third and last day of my visit that I realised that the windows had a story to tell.

Although they belong to the same building,  two windows show opposite views. There is also a back way for those ready to jump over the wall.

 

Yearly self-portrait au carré. 2019

Yearly self-portrait au carré. 2019. J.Harms.

Yearly self-portrait au carré. 2019. J.Harms.

Another year another portrait. This one is me sitting on my « carpet studio » looking at my reflexion in a mirror. At the back a glimpse of the window overlooking a cherry tree. My work as a decorative painter has been thriving, and sadly my paintings have been few and far between as a consequence. Three so far this year isn’t much. Yet there are so many things I need to paint.

 

La maison des amis de Jenny. 2019

A5848800-DA64-48FF-8AAC-9C2E67B0187FLa maison des amis de Jenny. 2019. J.Harms. Acrylic on canvas board. 28,5×22,5 cm. Commission.

A small painting depicting a house in Brittany, commissioned by my elder sister Jenny. Painting something I have never seen personally is not my favorite thing. However, I don’t think I made such a bad job out of it. I finished the painting after it was framed. The painting is signed on the top left side, right in the shadow.

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