The Gate . 2019

The gate. 2019. J.Harms.

The Gate . 2019. J.Harms. Acrylic on canvas. 22x27cm.

Taking a small break from my « Windows of Rye Serie ».

There are two parts to Rye, the one built within the fortifications, the more historical side, with its church, castle and cemetery, and the one built outside of the fortifications, the more contemporary side, with its supermarket and train station.

The ultimate purpose of a door, I believe, is to warn of a coming change. Those that decide to walk through the door, are somehow informed that their perspective is going to change.

If one crosses a door and then turns around, their grasp of a place, might totally differ from what they previously thought they knew. They might find themselves in an other reality.

 

 

 

 

The yellow window. Windows of Rye. 2019

The yellow window. Windows of Rye. J.Harms.

The yellow window. 2019. J.Harms. Acrylic on Canvas 46x55cm

Another « window of Rye » and behind it, a glorious  shade of yellow, it simply caught my eye, as well as the tree that looks as if it’s embracing or protecting this fragile source of light.

This house looks joyful and warm, even though it sits right outside of the cemetery.

 

Two point of views and a back way. Windows of Rye. 2019

Two point of views and a backway.julie Harms.

Two point of views. Windows of Rye. 2019. J.Harms. Acrylic on canvas. 38×46 cm.

This is the second painting from the Windows of Rye serie. Earlier this year, a couple of weeks before the first Brexit-date was suppose to take place, I visited the medieval city of Rye in the South of England, not far from Hastings. At first, I was interested in painting the different layers of the city. I spent quite a lot of time taking pictures of the streets from all sorts of angles. It was on the third and last day of my visit that I realised that the windows had a story to tell.

Although they belong to the same building,  two windows show opposite views. There is also a back way for those ready to jump over the wall.

 

La maison des amis de Jenny. 2019

A5848800-DA64-48FF-8AAC-9C2E67B0187FLa maison des amis de Jenny. 2019. J.Harms. Acrylic on canvas board. 28,5×22,5 cm. Commission.

A small painting depicting a house in Brittany, commissioned by my elder sister Jenny. Painting something I have never seen personally is not my favorite thing. However, I don’t think I made such a bad job out of it. I finished the painting after it was framed. The painting is signed on the top left side, right in the shadow.

Boat behind the window. Windows of Rye. 2019

Boat behind the window. 2019. J.Harms. Acrylic on paper. 48x63cm.

I recently (re)-visited Rye in Sussex. At first I thought about painting a couple streetscapes, Tudor style buildings and all, but for some reason my eye was more interested in the decorated windows of the old city. I usually let a couple months go by before revisiting my pictures, but with “B” day coming up, I feel a sense of foreboding in the air. This particular window with the boat, turns out to be more than that. A boat is a strong symbol of freedom, but this one is stuck behind a window…

L’arbre d’or. The 6th continent 12/365. 2018

l'Arbre d'or. The 6th C. J.Harms. 2018

L’arbre d’or. The 6th Continent 12/365.2018. J.Harms. Acrylic on paper. 10x15cm.

Row row the boat gently down the milky lake, our wandered settles on a crumb of an island to rest for the night under the golden tree. There he remains till dawn.

La place du fort sous la neige. 2018

La place du fort sous la neige. 2018. J.Harms. 29 x 39 cm. Acrylic on red paper.

I love snowscapes, so when my village got heavily covered in snow a couple weeks ago, I immediately went out to take pictures. I wanted to paint it. Not many people were out and about, but a couple foot prints on the Place du fort, one of the two village squares, were proof that another soul had been here possibly pulling a two-wheeled cart of some kind.

 

No more posts.